Free Summer Fun in Brooklyn

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Free fun in Brooklyn this summer.

Okay, it’s Fourth of July week, and so summer 2018 is well under way. Temps are in the 90s, and night times can be steamy. But, despite the heat, we can’t think of too many things to do on a summer day or evening than take a swim or catch an outdoor concert or movie, and there are plenty of places to do all that here in Brooklyn, and all for free. Have a look at our quick rundown of just some of the free fun you can have this summer right here in Brooklyn.

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Fireworks over the beach at Coney Island. See them in person every Friday night at 9:30 through August.

Fireworks: Every Friday evening at 9:30 on the beach at Coney Island. Spend the whole day and wrap it up with a bang or go just for a beer and a blast. Take a blanket and sit on the beach. Offshore, you’ll see the lights of a dozen or more yachts, outboards, and party boats looming in the dark, anchored in wait for the display, which is well worth the trip. The show is a good twenty minutes of loud bangs and bright lights, with a finale that dazzles every time. Before and after, the boardwalk and amusement parks are open for additional thrills.

Music: We’ve already told you about the Celebrate Brooklyn! festival at the Prospect Park band shell, currently in its fortieth year. Organized by BRIC Arts Media, it is the concert series in Brooklyn, and one of the leading summer series in all of New York. It runs Thursday – Saturday through August 11. The full schedule can be found here.

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Celebrate Brooklyn! offers world-class entertainers in a world-class venue. Come join the fun this summer.

On a much more modest scale, the Red Shed Community Garden produces a monthly music event June through August. Coming up on Sat., July 14, are Avant Jardin, Chris McIntyre, and the Demapping Group Providence Research Ensemble, and on Sat. August 4, Charles Waters and a special Chicago guest, yet unannounced. Performances are 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m., Red Shed Garden 211 Skillman Ave., Bushwick

Movies:  There are at least four weekly outdoor movie series happening across Brooklyn, including

SummerScreen in McCarren Park, Williamsburg/Greenpoint, Wednesday, July 11 – August 29, 6:00 – 10:30 p.m. Live music preshow; food and beverages available or bring your own. Screenings this year will be Jawbreaker, When Harry Met Sally, Love & Basketball, Hackers, Fantastic Mr. Fox, Die Hard, and This is Spinal Tap.

Red Hook Flicks at Valentino Pier, Red Hook, Tuesdays, July 10 – August 28. This series has a great lineup of films, including Harold and Kumar go to White Castle, Creed, Captain Underpants, Roadhouse, Hairspray, Silence of the Lambs, Coco, and Dr. Strangelove.

Movies at Transmitter Park

Free movie night at Transmitter Park, Greenpoint. There are free movies being shown all around Brooklyn this summer.

SummerSTARZ at Transmitter Park in Greenpoint, Friday July 6 – August 10. 8:00 – 10:00 p.m. Bring your own picnic! Screenings will be The Lego Batman Movie, Inside Out, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, Coco, Guardians of the Galaxy, and Black Panther

A Summer Movie Under the Stars in Prospect Park’s Long meadow, Wednesday, July 18 – August 8. Shows start at 7:00 p.m. with pre-screening live music and activities. Scheduled flicks are The Wizard of Oz, Alice in Wonderland, West Side Story, and Space Jam.

Another quick series, Movies Under the Stars, sponsored by the Parks Department, is scheduled to show six films in the first two weeks of July at various locations around the borough. (The series is in full swing throughout the city).

Other free film events include

The Cinema Garden Party’s showing of Chasing Trane: The John Coltrane Documentary, Friday, July 7 at 7:30 p.m. at the First Quincy Street Community Garden on Quincy Street between Tompkins and Throop Avenues in Bedford-Stuyvesant.

Rooftop Films’ presentation of an anthology of Sundance Short Films on July 19 and a screening of Pick of the Litter on August 23, 8:00 p.m., both events on the Central Lawn in Ft. Greene Park, DeKalb Avenue and Washington Park (Cumberland Street).

A Wrinkle in Time, presented by the Wyckoff House Museum in Canarsie, Fidler-Wyckoff House Park, Thursday July 26 at 8:00 p.m. PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED at Eventbrite.

Red Hook Pool

The public pool at Sol Goldberg Rec Center in Red Hook is one of the largest in the city.

Swimming: The NYC Parks Department’s outdoor pools are open, so jump in! Red Hook’s Sol Goldberg Rec Center; D&D (Third Avenue between Degraw and Douglass) in Gowanus; McCarren Park in Williamsburg/Greenpoint; Kosciuszko Pool, Marcy and DeKalb Avenues, Bed-Stuy; Bushwick Pool, Humboldt Street and Bushwick Avenue; Sunset Pool in sunset park, 42nd Street and Seventh Avenue; and elsewhere around the borough. Pools are open from 11:00 – 3:00 and 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. You must have a bathing suit and a lock to get in. White shirts only in the pool area.

This is definitely not an exhaustive catalog of free things to do in Brooklyn this summer, but it will give you a lot to start with. Enjoy your summer!

 


 

Celebrate Brooklyn! Forty years of Entertainment

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Celebrate Brooklyn! offers audiences world-class entertainers in a world-class venue. Come join the fun this summer in Prospect Park.

 

We try to celebrate Brooklyn every day. In Prospect Park, the Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival of free music, dance, and movies has been celebrating and entertaining people from Brooklyn and beyond for 39 years. Their fortieth season opened last night (June 5) and will be showcasing artists of many varied genres on weekends through August 11. Get there!

The rapper / / / Common headlined last night’s opening concert, and the Mexican-American rock band Los Lobos will perform Sunday (June 10) at 3:00. Future concerts feature well-known artists including The Jayhawks, Aimee Mann, SuperChunk, Branford Marsalis, Mala Rodriguez, Kronos Quartet, Anoushka Shankar, Brandi Carlyle, BADBADNOTGOOD, Tarrus Riley, and the Breeders. That’s just a partial lineup of the summer music, and it’s all free! (Ushers at the gate will ask for a small donation. You don’t have to give, but please do.)

Crowd image join the fun

Many concerts draw crowds from all over the city and the extended metro area.

If you’re in the neighborhood and don’t want to spend the evening, the park is open, and plenty of folks stand along the perimeter road behind the fence at the back of the audience, and/or sit in the grass across the road. Inside the gates, there are food and beverage tents serving the usual festival-style fare.

In addition to the free concerts, there will be a handful of benefit concerts for which tickets cost money. These will feature the Decembrists, Vance Joy, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead, and Jason Mraz. A privacy fence is put up around the audience for the paid-for concerts. No roadside views available.

The full schedule for the summer is at https://www.bricartsmedia.org/events-performances/bric-celebrate-brooklyn-festival.

Besides Celebrate Brooklyn!, the BRIC organization runs a public exhibition space in Downtown Brooklyn, called BRIC House, which has a glass-enclosed TV studio that is used for BRIC TV, a public access TV channel featuring community programming; two performance spaces; and work spaces for artists. The organization also offers support for artists and media creators.

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This is the 40th continuous year of the Celebrate Brooklyn! festival, organized by the BRIC organization.

The Celebrate Brooklyn! venue, the Prospect Park band shell, is on the west side of the park between the 9th street and 11th Street entrances and not far from the 15th Street entrance at Bartell-Pritchard Square. The nearest train stations are the F and G Seventh Avenue station, exit at 9th Street and 8th Avenue, one block away from the band shell, and at 15th Street-Prospect Park, exit at Bartell-Pritchard Square, 15th Street and Prospect Park West (9th Avenue). The band shell is wheelchair accessible, performances are rain or shine, and all ages are welcome, <1 and up (but note: the music is often loud).

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The Prospect Park band shell has state-of-the-art lighting and sound systems, and many nights hosts crowds of thousands.

The band shell was built in 1939 and renovated in 1983 and again in 1998-99. It has state-of-the-art lighting and sound systems and is in an environment that can’t be beat.

If you’ve never been to Celebrate Brooklyn!, check the schedule and make a point of coming out this year. Whether you’re coming from Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, Long Island, or from anywhere around the world, it’s well worth the trip.(https://www.bricartsmedia.org/events-performances/bric-celebrate-brooklyn-festival)

Travel Tip: Subway, biking (bike check station at 11th Street entrance), or walking is best. Park Slope doesn’t have a glut of parking spaces on non-concert nights. When crowds come in, fugeddaboutit.

 


 

Nitehawk: Not a Movie, a Movie Theatre

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Rendering of the marquee of the new Nitehawk Prospect Park theatre.

Already something of a fixture in central Williamsburg, the owners of the dine-in movie house Nitehawk are giving a $10-million overhaul to Park Slope’s old Sanders Theatre (more recently the Pavilion), on Bartel-Pritchard Square at the Northwest corner of Prospect Park, and later this year the Nitehawk Prospect Park will open, with first-run, classic, rare, and independent movies onscreen and drinks and dinner delivered to your table. We can’t wait. 

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Rendering of the restaurant under a screening room in the Nitehawk Prospect Park. Architects: Think! Architecture and Design.

The new Nitehawk will have seven screening rooms, vs. the three at the Williamsburg venue, and four of those will have 35-mm projectors, allowing for the screening of rarely shown films that are not available in today’s more common 70-mm and digital formats. And, there’s the food. Besides popcorn, you’ll be able to watch the movie while eating from a menu offering such non-traditional movie noshes as spinach-artichoke empanadas, paella risotto balls, and burrata crostini, which features roasted acorn squash and poached pears; or try a specialty item like the I, Tonya, made with shredded pork knee (ouch!), American cheese, and gremolata aioli. The owner of the Nitehawk,  Matthew Viragh, plans to offer a menu that’s different, but not unlike, the offerings in Williamsburg, so there should be more filling entrees like the sausage and pepper hoagie, the meatloaf sandwich, the Nitehawk burger, and the fried chicken sandwich. For drinks, there’s coke and root beer, and also a well-stocked assortment of whiskeys, scotches, tequilas, rums, and more. Wait service takes your order before or during the movie, and a good time is had by all.

Renovations are well underway at the Sanders, a landmarked building originally built in 1928 to replace the Marathon Theatre (opened1908). The 1,516-seat Sanders had a fifty-year run as a movie and vaudeville house. The Pavilion opened in 1996 as a three-screen multi-plex, and in the early 2000s underwent a second renovation, carved into nine screens.

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The Sanders Theatre, from long ago, via Cinema Treasures.

The building was sold in 2006 and the new owners, Hidrock Realty, devised plans to build a six-story condominium over the theatre and the adjacent one-story building (that once housed The Park House Restaurant and then Circle’s bar and Mexican restaurant), a plan eventually approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). The owners of the Nitehawk approached Hidrock about replacing the Pavilion, and in 2016 Hidrock sold the theatre to 188 Prospect Park West LLC, which immediately announced the closing of the Pavilion and the coming of the Nitehawk. Leading the renovation is Think! Architecture and Design, headquartered in Metrotech. The LPC has just approved a new marquee sign proclaiming the Nitehawk. 

 

At a time when digital viewing on multiple devices has taken over our consciousness, it’s getting harder and harder to find any outlet showing the many, many great films that have not yet been and perhaps never will be digitized. We’re excited that the Nitehawk is working to expand the number of venues for such films, and we plan on taking advantage of them, and the burrata crostini, too!


 

Brooklyn: Hollywood East?

Brooklyn: Hollywood East?

BSE Strip

Like television? So do we, and, it seems TV likes Brooklyn. Broadway Stages, the biggest film studio company in Brooklyn that you’ve never heard of, is growing faster than the famous literary Ailanthus tree. Most Brooklyners know about Steiner Studios, the long-time resident at the Navy Yard, and many have heard of CineMagic, and there are Kaufman Astoria and Silvercup in Queens. But there is perhaps a dozen or more smaller studios that are busy handling interior shots for the many TV shows and movies being shot in New York, and Broadway Stages, one of the biggest of those, is getting bigger.

Broadway Stages is home to interior shots for such TV hits as VEEP, Mr. Robot, Master of None, Blacklist, Blue Bloods, Madame Secretary, and many more. The company already has a half-dozen locations dotted across Greenpoint, with others in Long Island City and Middle Village, Queens. Now, according to the Real Deal, they are growing further. The studio, headquartered on Meserole Street in Greenpoint, will be combining six single-lot buildings on nearby Kingsland Avenue into one, increasing the floors of those one-, two-, and three-floor properties to six to and the usable floor space to 101,623 from 41,233. The reconstruction is scheduled to begin in the spring and take a year or more to complete.

In a separate purchase, Broadway Stages last month wrapped up a deal with Exxon-Mobile to buy a large empty lot around the corner from the Kingsland Avenue properties, at 378-392 Greenpoint Avenue. That deal, at $10.2 million, gives Broadway Stages another 160,000 (+/-) buildable square feet for further expansion down the road.

New York TV production has increased dramatically in the past decade, and Broadway Stages is taking advantage and getting ready for a lot more right here in Brooklyn.

 

 


 

The Kings Theatre, A Treasure Restored

The Kings Theatre, A Treasure Restored

Deep in the heart of Brooklyn lies one of the most magnificent treasures in all of New York City: The Kings Theatre in Flatbush. Built as a grand movie palace by the Loew’s Corporation, the theatre first opened in 1929, when going to the movies was a social event, and the rich and the poor mingled in the lobby and sat in egalitarian style in the auditorium. The original design firm, Rapp & Rapp, modeled it after the Paris Opera House, with a nod to the Palace of Versailles, including many Baroque and Rococo elements as well as details in the then-popular Art Deco style, such as the wall sconce pictured below.

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Kings Theatre, Brooklyn, auditorium

The theatre rode high during the golden age of movies in the ’30s and ’40s, and presented vaudeville shows along with the movies. The palace deteriorated along with much of the surrounding area in the ’50s and ’60s before closing in the ’70s. Immaculately restored in a two-year-long renovation, the theatre had its ribbon-cutting in 2015 as a live-performance venue, with Diana Ross performing at the grand reopening, and the glory of the heyday of movies is back in Brooklyn. Acts and artists as varied as tKings_Theatre_Light smlhe Russian singing group the Turetsky Choir, hip-hop artist Sean Paul, the country musician Jason Isbell with the 400 Unit, various comedy shows, and many more popular acts now perform on the Kings Theatre stage on a regular basis.

The building is owned by the city these days, and operated by ACE Theatrical Group, which conducted the reconstruction led by the architectural firm Martinez + Johnson. The effort cost approximately $95 million. It’s definitely worth a trip out Flatbush Avenue to check out this gorgeously restored gem.

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Photo Credits:

Top: Lobby of the Kings Theatre: By Moucheraud (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0 . via Wikimedia Commons

Auditorium: By Alexandra Silversmith (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Art Deco wall sconce: By Professorcornbread – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=44433911 , via Wikimedia Commons 

Exterior: By Jim Henderson (Own work) [CC BY 3.0  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons


 

 

BAM: Brooklyn’s Gold- Standard Venue

The Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), at the edge of Downtown Brooklyn in Fort Greene, is the oldest continuously operating performance arts center in the country. It is a world-class institution with venues in multiple buildings, presenting programs of theatre, dance, music, opera, and movies by highly regarded, internationally known performing artists and companies, attracting audiences from around the world.

The original academy, opened in 1861,BAM Concert Hall 1908 w caption 400w
stood on Montague Street in Brooklyn Heights, now the site of a mid-rise apartment building (180 Montague Street). Built for the Brooklyn Philharmonic Orchestra, it had a 2,000-seat theatre and a smaller concert hall. Contemporary luminaries including Edwin Booth and Ellen Terry performed there, and music and theatre productions professional and amateur filled its stages for over forty years.

In 1903, an early morning fire destroyed the Academy and a good portion of the block. It had become a major institution by that time, and a push to build a new structure began immediately. The architectural firm of Herts & Tallant, which had designed the New Amsterdam and Longacre theatres in Manhattan, won the contract to design the Academy, and the current building opened in 1908 with a performance of the Metropolitan Opera starring Enrico Caruso and Geraldine Farrar.

The new Academy had a Beaux Arts façade and two side-by-side main theatres, the Concert Hall and the Opera House with one grand lobby across the front of both. In addition, a gBAM Opera House A Hughes 400wrand ballroom graced the second floor. The institution thrived until World War II, when all attention and resources were given to the war effort. Afterward, the entire Borough experienced a decline as the returning soldiers married and moved out of the city to the new suburbs in Long Island and New Jersey. Attendance and programming at the Academy declined.

That ended in 1967 with the appointment of a new executive director, Harvey Lichtenstein. Under his leadership, the Academy slowly but surely returned to city-wide, national, and international prominence. The concert hall was reoutfitted as a full-fledged theatre and renamed the Helen Carey Playhouse, and in 1983, the annual fall Next Wave Festival began. This world-renown series features contemporary and cutting-edge theatre, dance, and music from around the world, featuring the likes of Peter Brook, Steven Reich, Philip Glass, Laurie Anderson, Pina Bausch, Robert Wilson, and literally hundreds of other first-class artists.

The physical plant has blossomed, as well. The ballroom was converted to a black box theatre in the 70s, and then to its current use, the BAMcafé, in 1997. The playhouse received a BAM Harvey Theatremakeover into a multi-screen movie house, the Rose Cinemas, also in 1997.  The 874-seat Harvey Theatre (Formerly the Majestic, renamed for Lichtenstein) on Fulton Street debuted in 1999, and the BAM Fisher theatre on Ashland Place opened its doors in 2012.  A brand-new space, the BAM Karen, is under construction as part of a new 31-story tall residential complex at 300 Ashland Place, across the street from the main building, which is now known as the Peter Jay Sharp building.

The rejuvenation of the Academy has spawned a growth or arts and arts-related organizations in the immediately surrounding area, and this section of downtown and Fort Greene is now an arts mecca, which in turn has attracted more people and other support businesses, including many restaurants and other stores. The entire area is in full-flowered renaissance, in no small part because of this great institution.